Antiperspirants for Sweating

Antiperspirants for Sweating

  • Best Results2-4 days
  • Treatment RecoveryNA
  • Procedure Time10 seconds
  • Skin SpecialistYou
  • Duration of Results12 hours
  • AnaestheticNA
  • Back to WorkNA
  • Cost$

Antiperspirants for Sweating

Antiperspirants are formulated to reduce sweating. Deodorants are formulated to stop body odour. Aluminium salt formulations can be classified as clinical strength antiperspirants with concentrations ranging from ten to twenty percent. The higher the percentage, the higher the chances of skin irritation.

FactsFacts on Antiperspirants for Sweating

  • Antiperspirants reduce or stop sweating
  • If you are after a topical to reduce sweating, look for a clinical strength antiperspirant
  • Clinical antiperspirants contain metal salts, most commonly aluminium chloride
  • To qualify for a Medicare rebate you must first trial clinical grade antiperspirants
  • Deodorants masks or deodorize body odour
  • Learning how to apply antiperspirants can reduce skin irritation
  • If your sweating fails to improve with antiperspirants, anti-sweating injections can be contemplated
  • Anti-sweat injections are subsidised by Medicare

How do Antiperspirants for Sweating Work?

Antiperspirants are applied to areas of excessive sweating. Sweat in the area grabs the particles of agents in the antiperspirant solution through a mechanism known as ‘osmosis’.

The particles are pulled into the pores and form a superficial plug at the level of the sweat gland entrance. This in turn stops the production and flow of sweat. The plug is not permanent, and antiperspirants will need to be applied every 1-3 days, as the plug is degraded over time. Reapplication can be individualised.

What is the difference between antiperspirants & deodorants?

Antiperspirants work to block your sweat glands using active aluminium-based ingredients to stop you from sweating. Deodorants typically soak up the bacteria which causes odour and keep you smelling fresh.

There are many antiperspirants that also act as deodorants, but not the other way around.

Everyday antiperspirants contain metallic salts which block sweat ducts, reducing the amount of perspiration that reaches the skin. If you’re still struggling to contain underarm sweat, a stronger clinical antiperspirant may be required. These have a higher concentration of aluminium chloride, usually 15 to 23%.

What chemicals are contained in antiperspirants?

The most effective antiperspirants contain a chemical known as aluminium chloride hexahydrate in a 15-20% solution. This is the formulation of Driclor (recently discontinued from the Australian market). A replacement antiperspirant is called NMS or No More Sweat.

Are antiperspirants safe to use?

The controversy is with the use of aluminium and anti-sweating lotions and antiperspirants.

Aluminium is commonly encountered in everyday life, from foils, food containers, drink cans and even food! The amount of exposure you receive from an antiperspirant compared to your diet is less than 3%!

There is talk that aluminium can be related to Alzheimer’s disease, however experts and research bodies have dispelled this theory. The safety of aluminium salts has been confirmed by the United States FDA.

There is concern that aluminium in antiperspirants can be absorbed and affect estrogen receptors on breast cells (which might lead to cancer). Several studies have failed to find a link between antiperspirant use and breast cancer. One of these studies was a 2002 US study of 793 women with no breast cancer and 813 women with breast cancer which showed no increased risk of breast cancer in women using deodorants or antiperspirants.

What brands do I recommend?

Patients with normal sweating patterns will respond to commercial over the counter antiperspirants, these include Rexona, Lynx, and other brands. For sensitive skin we recommend the QV range of antiperspirants. For significant sweating, we recommend patients to use Driclor or an equivalent percentage of 20% aluminium chloride hexahydrate.

Given the market withdrawal of Driclor in Australia, the next best antiperspirant available is NMS or No More Sweat. It is available thru all major pharmacies including Chemist Warehouse.

Davin’s Viewpoint on Antiperspirant & deodorant for sweating

Patients with normal sweating patterns will respond to commercial over the counter antiperspirants, these include Rexona, Lynx, and other brands. For sensitive skin we recommend the QV range of antiperspirants. For significant sweating, we recommend patients to use a clinical strength antiperspirant that contains aluminium chloride salts. A good starting point is 12%, maximal tolerated percentage is 20%.

Learning how to properly apply these more powerful metallic salts is important to reduce skin irritation. Failing this treatment, anti-sweat injections can be considered. This treatment is partially claimable via Medicare (if performed by a dermatologist).

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